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How Much For That Death Star? Expensive Items In Fiction

In fiction, money is obviously no object. But there are still items in the fictional world that would strain a pocketbook if they were real. Here are some of the most expensive items in the fictional world.

The Death Star (Star Wars)

The Empire’s moon-sized man-made space station had the ability to destroy an entire planet but was nonetheless destroyed itself by the Rebel Alliance…twice.

Original price: $852,000,000,000,000,000

In 2016 dollars: $886,095,734,209,082,112.00

Xanadu (Citizen Kane)

The fictional home of media mogul Charles Foster Kane, located in San Simeon, California. The 40,000-acre mountaintop estate featured a private golf course, canals and a private zoo.

1941 price: $160,000,000

In 2016 dollars: $2,598,987,755.10

The Six Million Dollar Man

The Six Million Dollar Man was a 1972 TV series about an astronaut injured in a crash who received superior bionic legs, a right arm and a left eye. A new movie version is being produced, with an updated price tag.

1972 price: $6,000,000

In 2016 dollars: $6,000,000,000

The Atrox Queen Egg

Part of the Massively Multiplayer Online Real Cash Economy game Entropia Universe AB, the virtual alien egg has been sold among players several times, most recently in 2010.

In 2016 dollars: $76,653.43

The 12 Days of Christmas

The popular holiday song, published in either the late 18th or early 19th century, lists a series of pricey gifts: drummers, dancers, milking maids, birds, golden rings, etc.

In 2016 dollars: $34,653.73

The Dragon Slaying Sabre and Scabbard

The virtual weapon is the only one of its kind in the multiplayer game Age of Wulin. In 2011, it was auctioned and sold to a Chinese gamer. At the time, the game had not yet been released.

In 2016 dollars: $17,117.32

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